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Cardamom-Blueberry Coconut Milk Popsicles (Low Histamine)

​These blueberry coconut milk popsicles feature two main flavors: coconut and cardamom, with a side serving of spicy ginger. Plus, making these cardamom blueberry popsicles with frozen blueberries means that they’re a vegan low histamine dessert that can be made year-round. If you’re eating low histamine, just don’t forget to use coconut milk with no guar gum, or even make your own using pure coconut milk powder.

About this recipe

Easy to make. These blueberry basil popsicles will please picky kiddos and adults alike, and they’re super easy and fun to make!

Antihistamine powerhouse. Blueberries, ginger, and cardamom are strongly antihistamine foods, meaning that they contain plant chemicals which inherently help your body calm histamine production.

Uses up blueberries. Whether you’re trying to make room for a fresh batch of summer blueberries or using up a bag of frozen blueberries form the back of the freezer, this recipe sure makes use of a ton of blueberries!

Ingredients

Blueberries: these bright berries are an antioxidant and antihistamine powerhouse, perfect for low sugar, low histamine desserts! Making blueberry popsicles with frozen blueberries doesn’t have to cut down on their power, either. Just be sure to use organic, locally-sourced blueberries when possible.

Cardamom: this floral, lightly citrusy seed is native to India and adds a beautiful complexity to coconut milk-based dishes, as well as an antihistamine punch. Try these honey cardamom cookies for a more unusual use of the spice.

Ginger: possibly the best-known low histamine spice, ginger is the sharp, mildly sweet root of a flower; it’s been used for thousands of years in dishes both sweet and savory. The ginger flavor in this recipe is subtle but important.

Amchur (Amchoor): pure ground green (unripe) mango. This Indian-origin spice is quite common in curries and stews, thanks to its sour flavor and simple storage. You can find it in any Indian grocery store, and it’s a great substitute for lemon and other sour flavors.

Manuka Honey (optional): there are a multitude of low histamine sweeteners you can use in desserts, but by far my favorite is manuka honey. Not only is it great for the digestive system, but manuka honey has been proven to lessen allergy symptoms, like those of histamine intolerance.

How to make blueberry coconut milk popsicles: step-by-step instructions

Step 1. Make sure your berries are thawed if using frozen, and then wash, measure, and pour them into your food processor and blend on high for 10 seconds, until all berries are macerated.

Step 2. Add the honey (or monk fruit), amchur, cardamom, ginger, vanilla, and salt, then blend everything on high for 15 seconds. Scrape down the side, and then pulse the mixture for 10-15 more seconds, until the mixture is homogenized (with no clumps of spices).

Step 3. Shake your can of coconut milk very thoroughly before opening it and pouring the contents into the blender mixture, scraping to make sure you got everything from the can. If you’re using powdered coconut milk, just follow the direction to make the coconut milk, and pour the requisite amount into the bowl with the berries.

Step 4 (optional). If your blueberry-coconut milk mixture separates and becomes clumpy, don’t worry; it can still make great popsicles. Just pour it into a pot, taking care to scrape everything in, and heat it on low over the stove for about 2 minutes, until it homogenizes again. Then use an immersion blender or hand mixer to mix everything together again, but don’t pour it into molds without heating if it’s separated. Let your heated mixture cool at room temp for 20 minutes or so, then proceed to the next step.

Step 5. Add the popsicle sticks to your molds, then pour in your blueberry coconut milk mixture, filling each one evenly. Stick your popsicles into the freezer for at least 4 hours, then pop them out and enjoy!

Recipe notes & tips

Freezing. Your popsicles will be ready to eat as soon as they’re frozen-through. They will last at least 3 months in the freezer, or up to 6 months if properly-stored, though it’s unlikely you’ll be able to keep your hands off them long enough to test these limits.

If clumping. Some of you may experience clumping or separating of the coconut milk into fat and water. If this happens, you must heat and re-blend your mixture before putting it into molds, otherwise it will stay separated when you freeze them.

Homemade Coconut Milk Popsicles Recipe Card

As always, if you like the recipe, I really appreciate a review or comment!

Blueberry Coconut Milk Popsicles

Blueberry Coconut Milk Popsicles

Yield: 8 popsicles (3oz each)
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes

Spiced blueberry coconut milk popsicles with just a touch of honey (or date syrup!).

Ingredients

  • 13.5oz. full-fat coconut milk (no guar gum)
  • 1 1/2 Cups fresh or frozen blueberries
  • 2 Tablespoons honey (alt: 1/4 teaspoon monk fruit extract)
  • 1 teaspoon ground amchur (amchoor)
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/8 teaspoon vanilla bean powder
  • pinch of salt

Instructions

  1. Make sure your berries are thawed if using frozen, and then wash, measure, and pour them into your food processor and blend on high for 10 seconds, until all berries are macerated.
  2. Add the honey (or monk fruit), amchur, cardamom, ginger, vanilla, and salt, then blend on high for 15 seconds. Scrape down the sides, and then pulse the mixture for 10-15 more seconds, until there are no more clumps.
  3. Shake your can of coconut milk, then pour the contents into the blender, scraping down the can. If using powdered coconut milk, prepare it as directed and move onto the next step.
  4. (optional) If your mixture separates and becomes clumpy, don’t worry; it can still be saved. Just pour it into a pot and heat it on low on the stovetop about 2 minutes, until it comes together again. Then use an immersion blender to mix everything well, and let your mixture cool at room temp for 20 minutes.
  5. Add the popsicle sticks to your molds, then fill each one evenly. Stick your popsicles into the freezer for at least 4 hours, then pop them out and enjoy!

Notes

FREEZING: these popsicles will stay good in the freezer for 3-6 months, depending on the temperature fluctuations in your home.

SPICES: you can start with half the amount of cardamom or ginger, but I wouldn't recommend adding any more, as they're both quite strong.

SWEETENERS: honey tasted the best of our trials, but date syrup is a good (vegan) alternative. For the diabetic-friendly alternative, some people hate the taste of monk fruit, and if you're one of those people, try using stevia instead (or 2 teaspoons of your liquid sweetener of choice).

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 8 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 143.82kcalTotal Fat: 11.51ggSaturated Fat: 9gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 1gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 25.95mgmgCarbohydrates: 11.38ggFiber: 1gSugar: 8.72ggProtein: 1.34gg

Nutrition data is primarily accumulated from online calculators for convenience and courtesy only, and can vary depending on factors such as measurements, brands, and so on. We encourage you to double-check and make your own calculations.

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