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Spiced Warm Ginger Milk (Low Histamine Drink)

As we head into the cooler months, I’m starting to think of what low histamine drinks I can heat on the stove in the evenings. I’ve been hankering for a low histamine chai replacement, so this spiced warm ginger milk is my version, made using a homemade hazelnut milk to add the complexity of high histamine chai spices.

About this recipe

Low Histamine Tea. So many people write me asking for low histamine hot drinks to enjoy in the cooler months, so this is one of my many food-based answers. Check out the low histamine drinks page for more recipes.

Antihistamine Powerhouse. Combining ginger with cardamom is an antihistamine powerhouse you’d be hard-pressed to beat.

Comforting Chai Replacement. My bf has claimed all the rest of my first batch of hazelnut milk for making into this milk tea, which he says tastes like a ginger chai. If you want to enjoy this through the week like he is, simply freeze it in ice cubes so you can warm them in the mornings, as desired.

Ingredients

Non-Dairy Milk: you can use any type of milk you’d like in this recipe, but I’d highly recommend trying a homemade non-dairy milk.

Fresh Ginger: possibly the best-known low histamine spice, ginger is the sharp, mildly sweet root of a flower; it’s been used for thousands of years in dishes both sweet and savory.

Cardamom: this is one of the best low histamine spices you can add to your pantry, as it’s both a natural antihistamine and it tastes fantastic. If you’ve never had it, cardamom tastes lightly citrusy and floral, a bit like coriander seed.

Honey: there are a multitude of low histamine sweeteners you can use in tea, but by far my favorite is manuka honey. Not only is it great for the digestive system, but manuka honey has been proven to lessen allergy symptoms, like those of histamine intolerance.

How to make warm ginger milk: step-by-step instructions

Step 1. Put the milk, ginger, and cardamom in the pot and heat all on low for about 7-10 minutes, lowering the heat if you start to notice it simmering.

Cookware Pro-Tip: Beware of copper! Keep an eye on your milk and stir it frequently if you’re using a high-heat conducting pot, like the copper pot I used. Otherwise your milk may burn and/or separate like mine did the first time, which looks a whole lot like curdled milk (see below).

Step 2. Strain through a loose-leaf tea strainer (or coffee filter if you’re particular about getting out all the cardamom bits), and then stir in the honey and enjoy!

Recipe notes & tips

Using Ground Ginger: Just like the ground cardamom, you can also use ground ginger in this recipe, but just use 1/2 teaspoon since the flavor is stronger.

Milk Type: I prefer to use hazelnut or macadamia nut milk to make this tea in the evenings, but you can try any variety of nuts or seeds when making your nut milk at home. A friend prefers pistachio milk, but I’ve fount it too bitter.

What to do with spiced ginger milk

  • enjoy it warm
  • turn it into ice cubes and enjoy it with your favorite tea
  • pour it over your favorite tea cake
  • use it chilled in place of milk for cereal
  • replace your usual dessert with a sweetened beverage

Homemade Warm Ginger Milk Recipe Card

As always, if you like the recipe, I really appreciate a review or comment!

Spiced Warm Ginger Milk (Vegan, Low Histamine)

Spiced Warm Ginger Milk (Vegan, Low Histamine)

Yield: 1
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes

A comforting and sweetly complex warm milk with the mild bite of fresh ginger.

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup nut milk
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom (or 2 whole open cardamom pods)
  • 1 thick slice of fresh ginger, peeled & crushed
  • 1 teaspoon honey (if desired)
  • pinch of salt

Instructions

    1. Put the spices and milk in a pot and heat on low for about 7-10 minutes, lowering the heat if you start to notice it simmering.
    2. Strain through a loose-leaf tea strainer (or coffee filter if you're particular about getting out all the cardamom bits), add your honey and enjoy!

Notes

COOKWARE. Keep an eye on your milk and stir it frequently if you're using a high-heat conducting pot, like copper. Otherwise your milk may burn and/or separate like mine did the first time, which looks a whole lot like curdled milk.

MILK TYPE. I like using hazelnut or macadamia nut milk to make this tea in the evenings, but you can try any variety of nuts or seeds when making nut milk at home.

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 1 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 122.06kcalTotal Fat: 2.6ggSaturated Fat: 15gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 59gCholesterol: 20mgSodium: 298.53mgmgCarbohydrates: 23.71ggFiber: 10gSugar: 20.93ggProtein: 1.26gg

Nutrition data is primarily accumulated from online calculators for convenience and courtesy only, and can vary depending on factors such as measurements, brands, and so on. We encourage you to double-check and make your own calculations.

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