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11 Low Histamine Breakfast Ideas

As someone who only eats brunch and dinner, finding low histamine breakfasts was the struggle. I’ve sorted out my morning coffee (& the sugar), and I’ve sorted out my snacks, but the late morning meal always ended with me, two eggs, and a piece of meat. It got super boring after a few months, and eventually I shifted to eating just lunch and dinner. Then I found a muffin recipe, and pancakes, and porridge and sweet potato mash, and my world changed.

Some of these low histamine breakfast ideas may not work for you, depending on any other intolerances you have. I also recommend that you practice intermittent fasting when possible, because it gives your body time to calm down from the inflammation of the previous day’s histamines. You could easily combine a variety of these low histamine breakfasts with some of my side dishes to create a different balanced meal to start off every day of the week.

Savory Sweet Potato Mash w/ Toasted Pecans

This is for those who prefer a softer breakfast that’s fine to eat cold or hot, and can be made sweeter or more savory, depending on your preference. I like the textural addition of chopped pecans or pili nuts with my sweet potatoes, but only if they’re truly pureed. I’ve linked a low histamine recipe option below, but if you can’t handle ghee, in this case it’s fine to replace it with avocado oil or coconut oil.

Get the recipe here.

Sweet Potato Hash

I don’t yet have a formal recipe available for this, but that’s sort of the beauty of it. This is one of my safe meals, as it’s basically a veggie stir-fry that uses up whatever you need to get rid of. The base is one small sweet potato, and you customize the spices for whatever the other veggies you throw in end up being. I can somehow tolerate frozen uncured bacon, so I usually start with two pieces of that, and then cook everything else in the grease. Avocado oil or refined coconut oil is the best substitute for animal fat.

Once your oil is hot, add diced sweet potato & sliced brussels sprouts, and then cook it further with a sprinkle of ground cumin, coriander seed, garlic, and a handful of chopped green onion on top. Serve it with a fried egg on the side (though any protein works), and voila! A low histamine breakfast plate in under 20 minutes.

Chia Pudding w/ Fresh Fruit

I make chia pudding a few times a month, now in smaller batches since I learned what flavors I like. It takes about 2 minutes to make, and it’ll set overnight in the fridge for the perfect companion to a breakfast apple or a handful or nuts. If you’ve never had it, chia pudding is a lot like tapioca pudding or rice pudding, except that it has much smaller textural additions, with the crunch of chia resembling kiwi fruit seeds. Chia pudding takes on the flavor of whatever liquid is added to it and whatever it’s flavored with. I’m partial to coconut milk and finely chopped fresh fruit, but I’ve heard equally good things about almond milk.

Get the recipe here.

Latkes w/Pesto Chicken

This is a two-parter, but both parts can be made in advance and frozen, to be reheated one serving at a time for a low histamine brekkie! First are the latkes, which are a Jewish potato pancake that taste great by themselves but even better with a dollop of pesto-smothered chicken or ground bison cooked in herb butter. You can make latkes using the recipe linked below, but make them using gluten free flour and sunflower oil (for frying).

Get the latke recipe here.

Omelette w/ Fresh Herbs

This is probably the most pedestrian recommendation I could make, but I’d be remiss if I failed to point out that eggs are low histamine. As long as you don’t have any unrelated issues with eggs, an omelet made with fresh herbs and a dash of homemade oat milk can become a potent antihistamine. Hens that have been allowed to graze and to lay eggs without being pumped full of hormones are going to produce better quality product, and those are the eggs you should start with.

From there, add in fresh basil, rosemary thyme, arugula, and even some pea sprouts or nigella sativa seeds, if you keep either of them on hand; each of these have mast cell-stabilizing or antihistamine properties. Serve up your omelette with a side of asparagus or half a sweet potato, and you’ve got one very fulling, low histamine breakfast.

Rice Cereal w/Non-Dairy Milk & Berries

While Rice Crispies might not immediately scream health to you, puffed brown rice is low histamine and delicious with oat or coconut milk. I’d recommend looking for an organic brand of puffed rice cereal, making sure it’s not enriched with anything. My favorite combo is oat milk with chopped toasted almonds and fresh organic blueberries, but to eat their own.

Antihistamine Smoothies

People have all sorts of ideas about what’s good in a smoothie, but I know for sure what’s bad in a smoothie: anything high in histamine. Luckily this still leaves you with plenty of wiggle room around fresh fruits, powerful antihistamine foods, and a handful of seeds or nuts for protein. It’s like a fruit & nut bar, but blended until it’s drinkable. Your goal with a breakfast smoothie is to add a good balance of different nutrients, make it taste good, and get enough protein, but the final flavor is all up to you.

Get some recipes here.

Blueberry Muffins

These were also mentioned in my low histamine dessert article, but they had to be featured here, too, because they’re just too perfect of a quick breakfast to exclude. They’re a slightly savory blueberry muffin which makes use of cassava flour, a generally non-triggering flour that’s great for those with mast cell activation syndrome, as well as the antihistamine powerhouse of blueberries (fresh or frozen). These blueberry muffins can be made ahead and be eaten throughout the week, stored in the freezer in a tightly-sealed container.

Get the recipe here.

Oatmeal (or Porridge)

Oats are both low in histamine and great if you have high cholesterol or acid reflux issues, and they’re very versatile for making low histamine breakfasts in a snap. But if you can’t tolerate oats, then porridge is your alternative. Oatmeal is actually a type of porridge, which is basically any grain or tuber cooked with your milk of choice, often flavored with fruit & nuts. This means that you can substitute oats for millet, quinoa, rice, or even sorghum. My top three porridge flavor combos are easy for me to prepare in under 15 minutes, and cook up easily in single servings:

  • macadamia butter (or pecan butter) with lightly chopped fresh berries
  • minced apples, toasted pecans, and a pinch of each clove & cinnamon (if tolerated)
  • high-fat coconut milk and fresh or frozen mango chunks

Butternut Squash Pancakes

Some people think of a fall breakfast and dream up a big plate of pumpkin pancakes, but pumpkins are pretty high histamine, so I’d recommend swapping it out for butternut squash. These pancakes are for those rare occasions when you cut up too much squash and need an easy way to use it up, and they’re great with fresh, monk fruit-sweetened whipped coconut cream. Freeze your fresh butternut squash puree in 1/2 cup containers to be able to make the recipe below at a moment’s notice, and swap out cinnamon for 1/8 teaspoon each of ground clove and cardamom. A more traditional alternative to sweet potato is buckwheat pancakes.

Get the recipe here.

Vegetable Fried Rice

This is for my friends who love cold pizza and day-old pad thai for breakfast as much as I do, er, as much as I did. I like to keep single-serve portions of rice in my freezer, along with frozen peas and carrots I’ve chopped, but sometimes I also add shredded chicken to keep it higher in protein. You can follow the recipe linked below, but be sure to use fresh corn kernels and replace the soy sauce with coconut aminos, or more conservatively, just add salt to taste.

Get the recipe here.

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